Purity by Jonathan Franzen

Jonathan Franzen. JFranz. The Fran-Fran Man. Some people love to hate him. Others hate to love him. After reading his latest, Purity, I’m in the hate to love him camp. At worst his misogynistic, at best simply sexist, but his prose – the way he can string a sentence together – is bliss. Continue reading

The Hotel on Place Vendome by Tilar J Mazzeo

hotel-place-vendomeI was going to Paris and wanted to read something set there to get me in the mood, so what better book than The Hotel on Place Vendome? The hotel being referred to is, of course, The Ritz and the book focuses primarily on The Ritz during the German occupation of Paris in World War II. Continue reading

The Blue Hour by Douglas Kennedy

The Blue HourI have really mixed feelings about The Blue Hour by Douglas Kennedy. Like, really mixed. It’s a kind of schizophrenic book for me, and perhaps for the publishers as well, as it is published in the UK as The Heat of Betrayal. And for the record, given the cover and title of the UK edition, i don’t think I ever would have picked it up. Continue reading

Private Citizens by Tony Tulathimutte

PRIVATE CITIZENS: A NovelI can tell you right now that Private Citizens by Tony Tulathimutte is going to be on my Best of 2016 list. I loved it. Tulathimutte could have so easily taken a great idea and made several missteps, but he doesn’t. The tone is perfect. The language is spot on. It’s brilliant. Continue reading

The Photographer’s Wife by Suzanne Joinson

photographers wifeSuzanne Joinson first came onto my radar with A Lady Cyclist’s Guide to Kashgar, a book I’ve been meaning to read but haven’t gotten around to yet. So when The Photographer’s Wife, Joinson’s latest novel came across my desk, I couldn’t pass it up. Set in 1920s Jerusalem and filled with political intrigue, I knew I’d love it from the start. Continue reading