The Parcel by Anosh Irani

I’ve long had a mixed relationship with Anosh Irani and his new book, The Parcel continues to make me feel the same way. Irani is a beautiful writer tackling the harsh realities of the poor and marginalized in Mumbai, and he does so again with The Parcel. That is to say, it, like his other works, is a heartbreaking tale that is beautifully written. Continue reading

The Path of Modern Yoga by Elliott Goldberg

My current obsession with yoga continues, so The Path of Modern Yoga by Elliott Goldberg seemed like a natural fit for my reading right now. I studied South Asian religion and philosophy in university, and I always knew that the ancient roots of yoga in India bore little resemblance to the LuluLemon yoga practice of today. In The Path of Modern Yoga, Elliott Goldberg shows how we got from there to where we are now by focusing on a few key yoga innovators.

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The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota

Well, if The Year of Runaways isn’t a heart-breaking work of staggering genius, then I don’t know what is. To me, it was like a modern, immigrant follow-up to A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry, which has long been one of my favorite books.  Continue reading

The Way Things Were by Aatish Taseer

The Way Things WereI’ve been putting off reading The Way Things Were by Aatish Taseer for a while because I was pretty sure I was going to love it and i did. It’s about a family of Sanskritists during the tumult of 1970s to present day India. That description hardly does the novel justice. It is, in fact, an epic exploration of the family, memory, trauma and how the past exists in the present. Continue reading

A House Called Askival by Merryn Glover

A House Called Askival by Merryn GloverI know what you’re thinking … where have i been? Well, that’s another story (hint: Canary Islands), but I’m back with a bundle full of reviews to write. First up – A House Called Askival by Merryn Glover. It’s published by a small Scottish press, so you may not have heard of it, but it is well worth searching for it. Continue reading

The Mountain Shadow by Gregory David Roberts

the mountain shadow by Gregory David RobertsThe Shadow Mountain is Gregory David Roberts‘ much anticipated follow-up to Shantarambut for me, it fell short of Shantaram in everything but length, if you can imagine that. It picks up on the story where Shantaram left off, so in theory it should be just as captivating, but instead it left me wondering if Shantaram was really all that great. That being said, I still read all 912 pages of it. Continue reading

Man on Fire by Stephen Kelman

Man on Fire by Stephen KelmanYou guys, I’m drowning in the amount of stuff occupying my time. And I was supposed to be taking it easy this fall!!

So I’m going to do a really lame review of Man on Fire. It really deserves more attention, but this is all it’s going to get.

I liked it.

I’ve passed it on to my husband.

I’d give it 3.5/5 if I rated books.

It’s based on a real person and it’s crazy.

And I’m going to take Ron Swanson’s golden words, as posted by Kerry at Entomology of a Bookworm, to heart.

never half ass two things ron swanson

See ya when life gets manageable.