Hell-Bent by Benjamin Lorr

hell-bentI’ve recently gotten back into doing yoga. And the thing that nobody ever tells you about yoga is that it becomes kind of addictive. So when I walked into my library and saw Hell-Bent I had to pick it up. It is a compelling and revealing memoir about one man’s descent into Bikram yoga, a bit of a take down of Bikram himself by a practitioner and a look at the darker side of what yoga has to offer. Oh, and it’s un-put-downable. Continue reading

A Queer and Pleasant Danger by Kate Bronstein

A Queer and Pleasant Danger by Kate BornsteinYes, it’s true, the title – A Queer and Pleasant Danger had me hooked before I had even opened the book. But come on, word play like that? you know the whole book is going to be well-written if nothing else. And it’s by Kate Bornstein, the original gender outlaw. And it’s got its fair share of Scientology in it. I may as well stop my review here because this book ticked all my boxes. I loved it. Continue reading

Without You, There is No Us by Suki Kim (audio)

Without You There Is No Us by Suki KimI don’t listen to audio books very frequently. So often they just don’t ‘sound’ right to me. But I’ve had a head cold and a massive headache and did not read for 5 days. This is almost unheard of in my life. The one thing that saved me was the audio version of Without You, There Is No Us by Suki Kim. Continue reading

Visiting Hours: A Memoir of Friendship and Murder by Amy Butcher

Visiting Hours by Amy ButcherI finished Visiting Hours by Amy Butcher last night, and I still don’t know exactly how i feel about it. The real-life premise is stunning: in college one of Butcher’s best friends commits a horrific and grizzly murder. Seriously. Put yourself in her shoes. How do you move on from such an event? That is what Visiting Hours is about – Butcher trying to piece together her life in the immediate aftermath of the crime and in the years following it. Continue reading

Born To Walk by Dan Rubinstein

Born to Walk by Dan RubinsteinTwo things to confess before we get into the review of Born To Walk by Dan Rubinstein:

  1. I love to walk. We don’t have a car and I walk everywhere. So, Rubinstein is kind of preaching to the choir with this book.
  2. I know Dan. He’s a great guy.  But what i never knew, and I don’t know how this is possible, is that he is even more into walking than I am.

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The Porcelain Thief by Huan Hsu

The Porcelain Thief by Huan HsuI don’t know why I am drawn to tales such as this one – an individual’s search for their family’s origins – when in actuality, i find the topic of family history rather dull. But The Porcelain Thief sounded truly intriguing to me: an American Born Chinese (ABC) goes back to China to try to find the treasure his great-great-great grandfather buried when the Japanese invaded in the early part of the 20th century. Continue reading

Geek Sublime by Vikram Chandra

geek-sublime-naI don’t even know where to start with talking about Geek Sublime. Vikram Chandra has long been a favorite author of mine, so I knew I was going to read this before I even knew what it was about. Then I found out that it was about computer coding and Sanskrit poetics and I was hooked. Continue reading